Museums / Galleries

Retrieving The Connection: Carmel Berkson: New Work: 2013-2015: Sculpture (New York, NY)


Retrieving The Connection:  Carmel Berkson: New Work: 2013-2015: Sculpture Dates:  ongoing
Venue:  Carmel Berkson Studio, 39 Claremont Avenue, New York, New York
Details: "Indian Mythological Themes The title, Retrieving the Connection, refers to the primal force within a particular culture which has been retained as unique, which drives its fundamental spirit and orientation at all levels of society. Obliteration of the historical heritage can only lead to desolation. In India, the past and its profound influence and meaning is vitally alive today. People are very much connected and involved in rituals at and within the plethora of stone monuments-temples and cave temples which pervade the landscape and can thus be active for retrieval of the connections at all levels. As sculptor, photographer and writer, but primarily as amazed and often fascinated student, Carmel Berkson spent more than forty years immersed in the various multiple Indian systems of artistic expression. Now back in New York, Carmel has resumed creating bronze statues; Her style, as always, has been entirely influenced by that of the artisans, sculptors and architects of India’s great historical artistic past."

Studio Visit
Carmel Berkson, new statues: 2011-2015
Please call for appointment
39 Claremont Avenue, New York, New York
1-212-531-3009 / Cave15ellora@gmail.com

 


Realms of Earth and Sky, Fralin Museum, UVA

Realms of Earth and Sky
Dates:
August 22 – December 14, 2014
Venue: The Fralin Museum of Art, The University of Virginia
Website:  http://www.virginia.edu/artmuseum/exhibition/earthandsky
Details: Curated by Daniel J. Ehnbom, Adjunct Curator of South Asian Art, The Fralin Museum of Art, and Associate Professor of South Asian Art, McIntire Department of Art, with Krista Gulbransen, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History, Skidmore College, and former Luzak-Lindner Graduate Fellow at The Fralin Museum.

Pranlal K. Patel's Photographs of Women at Work in Ahmedabad (Clinton, NY)

Refocusing the Lens: Pranlal K. Patel's Photographs of Women at Work in Ahmedabad
Dates:
February 1 - April 15, 2014
Venue: The Wellin Museum of Art, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY
Website:https://my.hamilton.edu/wellin/index.html
Details: The Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art will present the first U.S. exhibition of photographs by celebrated Indian photographer Pranlal K. Patel. On view February 1 through April 15, 2014, Refocusing the  Lens: Pranlal K. Patel's Photographs of Women at Work in Ahmedabad will feature 35 images that document the lives of women in the workforce in early twentieth-century India, as well as several other related works by the artist, and the original camera Patel used to capture these arresting
images.

Strange and Wondrous: Prints of India (Washington DC)

Strange and Wondrous: Prints of India from the Robert J. Del Bontà Collection
Venue: Freer-Sackler Gallery, Washington DC
Dates:  through Jan 5 2014
Details: As global travel boomed from the sixteenth to the twentieth century, Europeans and Americans became increasingly fascinated with Indian culture. Merchants, soldiers, and missionaries documented their visits to India and other foreign lands in illustrated accounts. Created using such techniques as engraving, aquatint, lithography, and photogravure, these subjects and designs were easily duplicated, and copies circulated widely. Publishers regularly edited, amended, or simply reprinted them in publications as varied as atlases, memoirs, and history books.
The spread of these images led to broader knowledge and interest in Indian culture—but also to the creation and proliferation of negative stereotypes. Ascetics, or religious figures who renounce material comforts, were depicted over the years as supernatural beings, devout penitents, militants, tricksters, and beggars. Religious ceremonies were interpreted within a Christian framework instead of a Hindu one, leading to misconceptions of devotees as sinners or fanatics. With the aid of Indian art, deities were catalogued as lovers, drug users, and creators of the cosmos, which fed generalizations of India as a sensual, spiritual land.

Ralli Quilts: Contemporary Textiles from Pakistan (Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena,)

Ralli Quilts: Contemporary Textiles from Pakistan
Venue: Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, CA
Dates:  December 20 2013 – March 2 2014
Details: Ralli Quilts: Contemporary Textiles from Pakistan features quilts made by women in the areas of Sindh, Pakistan, western India, and surrounding areas. This exhibition helps expand the conception of ‘contemporary art’ by looking at their form, color and pattern rather than solely how they are made, what they are for and the meaning of each color and pattern.

Canopies for the Goddess: Indian Textile Art (Museum Rietberg, Zurich)

Canopies for the Goddess: Indian Textile Art
Venue: Museum Rietberg, Zurich, Switzerland
Dates:  December 13, 2013 through 13 April 2014
Details: ‘Canopies for the Goddess’ is the name given to large-scale illustrated textiles in Gujarat that mark a sacred place for the veneration of goddesses. Men of the semi-nomadic community of the Vagri have been producing these beautifully worked illustrated textiles for many generations in the city of Ahmedabad, one of the oldest and most important textile centres in the world.   This exhibition shows a selection of these extraordinary textiles from the important collection which the former director of the museum, Dr Eberhard Fischer, recently gave to the museum. It offers a glimpse into the techniques and production processes, their religious iconography and ritual use.

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